Accessability Links
We use cookies to improve your experience when using our website.
Some cookies have already been set.
To find out more about the cookies we use, view our cookie policy
Accept
filter bycategory
Blogs by category
Professional & Business Support
(40)
Graduate Training Schemes
(39)
Customer Services
(37)
Energy Sales
(14)
Engineering & Technical
(11)
Videos
(11)
Resourcing team
(7)
Midlands
(6)
North East
(6)
North West
(5)
Smart Metering
(5)
South West
(4)
South East
(4)
Contact Centre
(3)
Human Resources
(3)
Scotland
(3)
Wales
(3)
HR
(2)
Digital
(2)
Digital
(2)
Meter Readers
(1)
Commercial & Risk
(1)
Business Support & Professional - Other
(1)
Video
(1)
More...
archive
Blogs archive
September, 2019
(2)
August, 2019
(2)
July, 2019
(2)
April, 2019
(1)
March, 2019
(3)
February, 2019
(1)
January, 2019
(3)
December, 2018
(1)
November, 2018
(5)
October, 2018
(8)
September, 2018
(3)
August, 2018
(2)
July, 2018
(2)
June, 2018
(5)
April, 2018
(4)
March, 2018
(3)
February, 2018
(3)
January, 2018
(3)
December, 2017
(2)
November, 2017
(5)
October, 2017
(4)
August, 2017
(6)
July, 2017
(4)
June, 2017
(3)
May, 2017
(4)
April, 2017
(1)
March, 2017
(2)
February, 2017
(1)
December, 2016
(3)
November, 2016
(3)
October, 2016
(1)
September, 2016
(4)
August, 2016
(2)
July, 2016
(1)
June, 2016
(4)
May, 2016
(2)
April, 2016
(2)
March, 2016
(3)
February, 2016
(4)
January, 2016
(5)
December, 2015
(3)
November, 2015
(7)
October, 2015
(3)
September, 2015
(1)
August, 2015
(1)
July, 2015
(2)
June, 2015
(3)
May, 2015
(3)
February, 2015
(1)
October, 2013
(1)
December, 2012
(1)
June, 2012
(1)
February, 2012
(1)
January, 2012
(1)
October, 2011
(1)
More...

How to apply your unique learning style to your career

08/02 2016Posted by: npower Resourcing Team Subscribe to this blog


Whether you’re a visual learner or prefer a hands-on kinaesthetic approach, there’s the perfect job out there to suit your style. Better yet, you can apply your learning styles to any job you set your mind to - it’s all a matter of knowing your strengths and working on your weaknesses.

Our previous article in the learning style series explored the four main learning styles and how you can identify which category you fit into. Now it’s time to explore how you can connect these to your current or future jobs. 

Consider roles that suit your learning style 

If you’re looking for a new job, a change of career or are just starting out in the working world, you have the added option of considering how your particular learning style could be suited to potential roles.

For instance, if you’re an aural or verbal learner who loves dealing with people and discussing problems and solutions, a customer service role could be just what you’re looking for. Alternatively, kinaesthetic learners who love working with their hands and troubleshooting may thrive in an engineering or technical job. Visual learners can also make for great engineers, so if you have both visual and kinaesthetic tendencies you could thrive in this area. Those who lean towards verbal learning could look at jobs in communications, where their love of language will be put to good use. 

Focus on your strengths and improve your weaknesses 

Identifying and understanding your learning style can not only help you during a job search, but it may also help you to boost your performance in an existing position. For instance, have you ever wondered why you zone out during discussions and speeches but come alive when reading the same information afterwards? It could all be down to being a verbal rather than visual learner.

According to Neil Fleming, creator of the VARK learning styles model, and David Baume, a higher education consultant, you’re more likely to understand information that you access via your preferred learning style. The following study strategies can help you make the most of your learning styles in the workplace.

Visual strategies include the use of mind maps, lists, brain storms, graphs, illustrations and videos when processing information. If you’re undergoing training or learning a new skill, take plenty of notes and diagrams as you go to ensure that you remember information afterwards, as simply listening to it may not work as well. Colour may also help you work, so opt for highlighters and bright sticky notes to help organise your work.


Aural strategies should involve the discussion and questioning of information and concepts, with tape recorders or other recording devices used to help jog your memory later. These types of learners may work best when given the chance to brainstorm and discuss things with colleagues, and don’t do as well relying purely on written notes for retention and understanding. Debates, lectures and presentations can be strongly suited to these workers. If you identify with this style, you may also find listening to music can help you focus while you work.

Verbal (reading/writing) strategies rely heavily on the use of language for understanding and retaining information. Equip yourself with dictionaries, thesauruses and glossaries to indulge your love for the written word, and take as many notes as possible during your work to help imprint information onto your brain. Rewrite complicated theories and instructions in your own words for better retention, and rearrange diagrams and charts into written text to help process the information.

Kinaesthetic strategies usually rely on the physical act of doing something, rather than simply listening or looking. You may do your best work when you’re on-site fixing something, on a field trip to learn more about a system or fixing or building a mechanism. Where possible, test theories and come up with practical examples for any new concepts, as you’ll better remember concrete things that actually happened as opposed to abstract writing and instructions.

Whether you’re looking for a new role or simply want to understand how you could be retaining more information in your current position, understanding your personal learning style can help you to fulfil your potential. If you are looking for a new opportunity, a role at npower may be just what you’re looking for. Find out what we can offer you here.
Share this
Subscribe to this blog via RSS
Related headlines
11/07 2019 Mindfulness in the workplace: What is it and how can you achieve it?
Mindfulness in the workplace: What is it and how can you achieve it?
The workplace wellness movement is more than simply a &l...
24/04 2019 What is neurodiversity and why does it matter in the workplace?
What is neurodiversity and why does it matter in the workplace?
The portmanteau “neurodiversity” was coined ...
LATEST JOBS